fbpx

Glorify just landed $40 million in Series A

Religion-based apps, tools and communities aren’t brand new, including investors. Pray.com, for example, an LA-based app for daily prayer and bedtime Bible stories that were founded in 2016, has raised at least $34 million from investors, including Kleiner Perkins. Ministry Brands, a nine-year-old, Knoxville, Tennessee-based outfit that now includes dozens of software and payments brands tailored to faith-based organizations, was acquired by Insight Partners in 2016 for $1.4 billion (which is reportedly now looking to flip it).

Still, fueled by a pandemic that drove churches to close, faith-based apps and communities are growing faster than ever — the most popular, Bible app, is now on more than 400 million devices worldwide — and getting more notice as a result.

The newest of these is Glorify, a two-year-old, 60-person, subscription-based “well-being” app that offers users guided meditation, along with audio bible passages and Christian music. The London-based outfit — whose 22-year-old co-founder and co-CEO, Ed Beccle, says he spends up to a third of his time in São Paulo — just raised $40 million in Series A funding led by Andreessen Horowitz, with participation from SoftBank Latin America Fund, K5 Global and a long string of famous individuals, including Kris Jenner, Corey Gamble, Michael Ovitz, Jason Derulo and Michael Bublé.

They talked with Beccle about Glorify, which is not his first company despite his young age. In fact, Beccle, who recently sold his previous company for what he describes as a “multimillion-dollar” exit, dropped out of high school at age 16 to work on his startups.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, during our conversation, he laid out a vision that extends well beyond meditation and Bible readings. He also offered a peek into how wealthy celebrities and startup entrepreneurs are being brought together. Excerpts of that chat follow, edited lightly for length.

TC: You say this is your third or fourth startup. With Glorify, did you see an opportunity or are you a religious person or is it a combination of both things?

Ed Beccle: I think definitely a combination of both. It’s hard not to get a little bit philosophical when you’re young, and you’re doing exciting things, maybe you make more money than regular people your own age. For me, at least, I stopped and thought, ‘Well, I can afford all the Ubers and Uber Eats in the world, and I don’t really spend any other money. I don’t have a mortgage or dependents. What would I do if I could do anything?’

[The answer] has always been working on tech that changes the way people think and feel. That’s what I’m kind of obsessed with. . . Now I’ve never been more proud of anything in my life than this company because it is so much more than just a business. I’ve come at it from a lot of different angles and one is very much on an emotional level and my own beliefs around faith. Then the other is: It’s the most incredible commercial opportunity. It’s going to be, I think, far bigger than people realize.

TC: You have a pretty interesting syndicate of investors. How did that come together?

Ed Beccle: I think it came together a bit like everything that I’ve done, which is just, you know, by my continually trying and chatting to as many people as I can and putting myself in a lot of awkward situations sometimes to get in front of the right people. In terms of the celebrity elements, I have to say that that was a shock. [Former Hollywood agent] Michael Kives has been a complete hero on this front; he sent me a message that said, ‘Are you free’ on whatever the date was. ‘I want you to come to dinner with me and the Kardashians’ and there were probably 25 people on the guest list that he sent over, and I’m not sure there was a single person aside from myself and one other who wasn’t an A-lister. Like, it was crazy. I walk through the door, and there was Michael [Bublé] and Jason Derulo, and, I mean, what you see on the press release is literally the tip of the iceberg. We’ve only released some of the names.

It comes down to: Why have we done it? Why have I tried so hard to get a lot of these people involved? It’s because we’re trying to create a cultural movement around faith and making believing in God and something greater, something that’s more than just okay [and into] something that can really change your life. My goal with all of these people is to get them to make Glorify the medium that they talk about their faith through. b

TC: Is the plan to evolve this into a full-fledged social network?

Ed Beccle: When we talk about it being a social network, 100%. It’s just that trying to look at social very differently. We want to optimize for very different things. I want to be building tight-knit engaged communities that are really meaningful and purpose-led, rather than things that are mass, superficially engaged, which is really the trap of social today. We don’t monetize through ads; the user really isn’t the product. We want to bring people closer together and not necessarily in huge groups but through amazing micro-interactions that can exist and bring you closer to a small group of people who you really care about.

TC: Are you close to break-even at this point?

Ed Beccle: Definitely not, but it’s very intentional. We’ve proven paid conversion, which we’re really happy about . . .  I believe the engaged audience that we will have will probably have a higher propensity to pay for all sorts of other products that we release. That cool daily worship product will [continue to] be in the Glorify app, although far improved, even in over the next few months, but [we think we can] take that audience and direct them to other products that we’ve created, where they’ll have a high propensity to pay.

TC: Are you talking about virtual tithing? Bible study?

Ed Beccle: An example would be in Christian dating. It’s an amazing, huge space, but anyone who really tries to build within it has to become kind of a Christian Tinder, using visuals to be the primary way you match people. I don’t know if that’s really the right way to go about it. Instead, you know, if you’re a user of Glorify, we’ll be able to match you with people based on shared beliefs [and] your engagement with the Bible [and] all sorts of things where we have almost a competitive advantage over anyone else because of the product that we’ve begun with.

Glorify seems to be a Christian Daily Worship & Wellbeing app that creates space and structure for its users to connect with God and their community every day. I’m sure the company will continue to prosper in its journey ahead. My best wishes to the team of Glorify.

Shishir Gupta, Founder and CEO, of StartupLanes

Don’t keep wondering about funding, you can also raise funds. Learn how to raise funds here: Yes I want to raise funds.

If you are an emerging startup and are looking for investors to raise funds, StartupLanes has its own angel network and investment banking services and is connected to angel investors and VCs in 15 countries that ensure that our member startups have easy access to external funds to scale up constantly.

You can subscribe to our news posts by entering your email in the box on the right side of this page.

Check out our YouTube channel for insightful content from the Indian startup ecosystem.

Or join our Whatsapp group to interact with other founders: Yes, I want to join the Whatsapp group.

The right investment is key to beating inflation and growing your wealth. Do you wish to become an angel investor? Yes, I want to be an angel investor.

Are you a startup and facing challenges in your business? Do you want to grow your business? It is not as difficult as it sounds. Learn how to grow your business here- Yes, I want to grow my business.

For publishing an advertorial article about your company on our website, drop an email at taniya@startuplanes.com

Tags

top